Some more of Fletcher’s favourites

recipes on Amateur Mommies

A few weeks ago, we shared some insights into our journey with solids. As part of that, we shared some of Fletcher’s favourite meals. Since then, we’ve had so many requests for a follow up with more recipes so, here are a few more yummy additions for your DIY baby purees and snacks. We try and keep it interesting for our growing boy, but he mostly enjoys anything we give him, which we are so thankful for. We are trying to keep the flavours varied so he develops a love for different kinds of foods and we aren’t stuck with a toddler who will only eat microwave noodles and crackers. Here’s hoping… 🙂

Coconut oil roasted butternut/pumpkin:

  • Try roasting your butternut chunks in a bit of coconut oil before mashing them for baby. The coconut brings out the sweetness in the butternut and the roasting keeps the butternut a but firmer than steaming. This does mean that the mashed/pureed finished product is a bit thicker and we found that the texture was not as smooth as steamed butternut, so Fletcher took a few spoons to get used to it, but just add a few teaspoons of water to your puree to thin it out. It really is yum!

Pears and plums:

  • Simple and delicious. If you have very juicy, ripe pears you might not need to steam them at all before your puree them, but if they’re a bit harder then try steaming for 3-5 minutes in very little water because they can become watery if you are freezing and defrosting portions (ice cube trays are amazing for this).
  • I chose dark red plums which I kept until very ripe and then did not steam them at all before blitzing up with the pears (five part pears to one part plum – this can be done in bulk and frozen). The dark red plums made for a fun, bright colour when mixed with the pears.

Apples and strawberries:

  • Also simple and delicious. Apples, unlike the pears and plums, do still need steaming, but only until they’re tender (when pureed they make for a chunkier mix if not over cooked and it’s good for baby to introduce different textures).
  • Strawberries, if very ripe also don’t need steaming (they also lose their colour if you steam them, which is a bit sad so try use them fresh). They can be added to apple mix before blitzing, the seeds seem to disappear and you’re left which another bright mix to freeze or use immediately. I also used about five parts apples and one part strawberries but try and vary the quantities so baby gets used to all the flavours and combos.

Baby hummus with carrot and cucumber sticks

  • Finger foods can be fun and exciting for baby and also for you. Teething rusks are great for little hands to grasp and gums to munch on but for something with a bit more flavour try some carrot and cucumber sticks dipped in homemade hummus. The carrot and cucumber sticks (skin on) will be hard enough for baby to munch on without taking off big chunks to choke on. But still keep an eye on them regardless and don’t cut the sticks too thin, like Julienne vegetables, rather leave them a but chunkier – about the width of your thumb.
  • For the hummus use half a can of chick peas (drain away the liquid) and mash or puree them along with one teaspoon of organic peanut butter (don’t use ordinary store-bought brands as these contain sugar), a squeeze of lemon juice, a teaspoon of olive oil and a pinch of cumin. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can also add a small amount of garlic. If your mix is a bit too chunky, you might need to add some water to thin it out. Dip your veggie sticks in your baby friendly hummus and watch your little one enjoy some fun finger foods.

What do you feed your little one? Why not share your recipes and meal ideas with us in the comments section, or email them through to submissions@wearethejoys.com, and we’ll put together a menu of favourites from our readers.

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A solid start in life

Amateur Mommies: starting solids baby food

For those who don’t know us and Fletcher personally, let me inform you that we have a very solid little man. He is tall and big and strong, and since he wasn’t sleeping very well, we decided to start the journey onto solid foods just after he was 4 months old. The baby-led-weaning sounds great – to just give them a piece of whatever you’re eating to hold and nibble on and they will fit in with your eating habits and choose what they like and don’t like – if you are brave enough for the mess it creates and aren’t terrified of them choking. Baby-led-weaning also doesn’t really allow you to track how much your little one is taking in as a lot will go all over his face and on the floor. We decided to go a with the old school approach of home-made purees, starting with veggies for a few days, then adding fruit and finally introducing proteins in week 3. It really is much easier to monitor how much they are consuming when you are in control of the spoon and our little man has proved to be a veritable vacuum, eating just about anything we give him and almost always finishing what was put in his bowl. It sounds like we could be giving him more, but not according to his weight gain over the last 6 weeks – he is still putting on 220 or so grams a week, which is the highest weight gain allowance in the newborn scale. From 6 months on, he should only be putting on between 80 and 140 grams a week, so we have to go back for a check-up in a month to make sure our giant baby isn’t putting on too much weight too quickly.

We started with good old butternut and had the camera rolling for the obligatory 21st video clip of “ahh this was your first food”.  He didn’t seem too impressed but didn’t spit it out either and now butternut is a staple that we always have on hand. After the first three weeks of weaning (first week veggies, second week fruit and veggies and third week protein, fruit and veggies) we started getting a bit more adventurous with what we gave him. We wanted to get the allergy tests – which he passed with flying colours – out the way early on, so we have given him peanuts, fish and eggs.

Wanting to give him the healthiest option and introduce him, right from the start, to good food choices, we have made all of is meals at home with fresh ingredients. Barbs and I love cooking and eating together, and being in the kitchen preparing a meal is more of a fun family activity than a chore. We want Fletcher to have this love for preparing good food and choosing healthy but tasty options right from the get go. That way we’ll have a child who makes good food choices and turns into an adult who, in turn, makes good food choices.

Here are some of his favourite meals so far:

  • Apples, pear and yoghurt
  • Paw paw, apple, pear and yoghurt
  • Rolled oats, apple, yoghurt and peanut butter
  • Brown lentils, butternut and sweet potato
  • Carrots and cinnamon
  • Roast chicken, butternut and kiri cheese
  • Cauliflower, broccoli and kiri cheese
  • Baby Bolognese, butternut and sweet potato
  • Hake and veggies

If you’d like the recipes for any of Fletcher’s favorites, we’ve included them here.

Fletcher’s Menu

Amateur Mommies: some of Fletcher's favourites

Apples, pear and yoghurt

  • For one portion: 1 tbs apple and pear mix, 2 tsp full fat plain yoghurt
  • Peel and chop 3 ripe pears and 3 apples (any colour), and steam for 10 minutes or until tender. Blitz for 5-10 seconds in the Nutribullet (if you have one, else a good old potato masher will do the trick) and keep in the fridge to use as necessary.
  • This makes a tasty and easy breakfast or anytime snack

Paw-paw, apple, pear and yoghurt

  • For one portion: 2 tsp paw-paw, 2 tsp apple and pear mix, 2 tsp full fat plain yoghurt
  • Cut a paw-paw in half and take the seeds out of one half, cover the other half in clingwrap and keep in the fridge. Cut the paw-paw into small pieces and mash with a fork to add to your apple and pear mix as above. Add some full fat plain yoghurt (no sugar or flavourings) for another great breakfast meal.

Rolled oats, apple, yoghurt and peanut butter

  • For one portion: 2 tsp rolled oats, 2 tsp apple (or apple and pear mix), 2 tsp full fat yoghurt and half a tsp of organic peanut butter.
  • Simmer the plain rolled oats until soft (10 minutes) and blitz or mash them up (they will still be grainy but this is good to introduce some different textures).
  • Add to your apple puree and yoghurt. Introduce some organic peanut butter (ingredients on the tub should only list peanuts, no preservatives etc.) as a nice flavour alternative and to check for peanut allergies. Watch your little one for signs of a rash or difficulty breathing the first time you give them peanut butter.

Brown lentils, butternut and sweet potato

  • For one portion: 2 tsp brown lentils, 3-4 tsp butternut and sweet potato mix
  • Cook the brown lentils (one cup lentils and 2-3 cups of water) until very soft (approximately 25 minutes). Mash or blitz until smooth – you may have to add some water as the lentils can be quite thick.
  • Peel and cut your butternut and sweet potato into similar sized chunks and steam for 10-15 minutes or until soft. These can be mashed or blitzed until smooth.
  • Add lentils when you are introducing protein or just give your little one the butternut and sweet potato mix, they usually love it just as it is.

Carrots and cinnamon

  • For one portion: 1 tbs carrots and cinnamon mix
  • Peel and chop a few carrots and steam until soft. Carrots are a bit tougher than other veggies so they might need a bit longer in the steamer. Mash or blitz them until you reach your desired consistency and add a few sprinkles of cinnamon for another exciting flavour for your little one to try.

Roast chicken, butternut and kiri cheese

  • For one portion: 1 tsp chicken, 3 tsp butternut, 1 tsp kiri cheese (full fat cream cheese)
  • After a roast chicken dinner take a few pieces of the softer breast and thigh meat and blitz with a hand-held blender until smooth. Add some of your butternut puree and chicken gravy to help with the blending. Add more butternut and cream cheese for a nice filling suppertime meal. We find that Fletcher sleeps well after a heavier dinner including animal protein.

Cauliflower, broccoli and kiri cheese

  • For one portion: 1 tbs cauliflower and broccoli mix, 1 tsp kiri cheese
  • Take a few cauliflower and broccoli heads and remove the stalks. Steam for a few minutes until tender and mash or blitz.
  • Add your cream cheese for some protein and give for lunch or dinner.

Baby Bolognese, butternut and sweet potato

  • For one portion: 1 tsp baby Bolognese, 3-4 tsp butternut and sweet potato mix
  • Fry around 4 tbs of lean beef mince in a pan until cooked through. Add 30-40ml of chopped tomato or tomato and onion mix and simmer for another 10 minutes. Blitz with the hand-held blender until smooth or slightly chunky. This will be enough for about 5-6 portions of baby Bolognese.
  • Add your butternut and cream cheese to your baby bolognese mixture for a miniature lasagne effect, your little one should love it. It makes them nice and full so also a good supper time option.

Hake and veggies

  • For one portion: 1 tsp hake, 3-4 tsp of your baby’s favourite veggies
  • Steam one piece of hake until cooked through. Flake off a few pieces (approximately 30g and use the hand-held blender until you reach a consistency your little one will tolerate. This will be enough for 4-5 portions when added to the veggies.
  • Add your little one’s favourite vegetables for a tasty meal, but watch for any signs of allergy the first time you give them fish (preferable to do it at lunch time so you can monitor them throughout the afternoon).

NOTES:

  • Keep the water from simmering your veggies in case you need to add some liquid to your blended mix if it is too chunky.
  • Use an ice-tray to freeze individual portions.
  • Mix and match these recipes to keep baby interested (variety is the spice of life).
  • Increase or decrease the portion sizes to suite your little one’s appetite.
  • Let baby sit in the kitchen with you in a pram so you can wheel him around as you move from chopping board to pot to blender – he loves to get a good look at the action and all the smells and noises are exciting.
  • I am no dietician, just a mom on a mission to give her baby a good solid start in life and wanting to share her ideas with other moms on the same mission. This post in no way constitutes medical advice. If your child shows any signs of food allergies, please consult your caregiver immediately.