Chances are, it’s not colic – but that doesn’t mean it’s not terrifying!

Throughout my life I’ve heard moms talking about their “colicky children” – my own mom has told me countless times how difficult I was as a baby because I had colic – but I never really knew what that meant. When we went to antenatal classes, the antenatal sister told us that colic is when “a child cries for three hours straight, three nights in a row, for three weeks.” My god! I thought, that sounds horrific – those poor parents! She quickly followed that up with a disclaimer: very few children diagnosed with colic actually have clinical colic, according to the definition.

When Fletcher was born we anxiously waited, hoping he wouldn’t display those dreaded symptoms, especially as I had been a “colicky baby”. But, right from birth, he was a superstar. Even in the NICU, he belched like a grown man, and he’s never really suffered from cramps or wind – touch wood. We may have been among the lucky few, but so many of our friends and antenatal classmates weren’t. We heard countless horror stories about babies crying for six hours straight and parents silently praying for their own deaths. These parents had tried everything – tissue salts, tummy massage, Telement drops – you name it. Nothing gave any relief. My heart went out to them, but there was nothing we could do to help, not really. Right?

That’s what I thought. But wondering through Hamely’s one afternoon, scoping out the amazing things we’d always covet but would most likely never be able to afford, we stumbled across a bottle designed to combat colic and cramps – an Dutch brand, called Difrax. My initial feelings were of skepticism, but as I did more research and found people who’d actually used the bottle, I started to buy into the idea. The trick is in the unique design – the bottle itself is S-shaped, with an airflow valve at the base.

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I pinched this pic off the net, but it gives the best description of how it all works

Basically, the valve at the base allows air into the bottle, and the S-shape means that air gathers at the top of the bottle, “pushing” the milk down towards the teat, which is then always submerged in milk, meaning your little one doesn’t swallow any air while drinking. Now, if your child has suffered from tummy cramps you’ll know, air is the devil! It’s those nasty little pockets of air in his / her intestines that cause those terrible cramps. Because they aren’t able to clear that air by burping, it has to work it’s way through their system, which can cause quite serious discomfort. The logic is flawless: no air in, no cramps!

Now, even though Fletcher didn’t have any trouble with his burping, we decided to give one of these bottles a try – just to test out the theory – and the result is undeniable. After a full feed, our normally gassy, belching little champ, didn’t even need to burp! He was as happy as two Larrys. So, my advice to anyone who’s little one is suffering from cramps or colic, is to get yourself down to Hamley’s and get one of these bottles. The results really do speak for themselves.

2 thoughts on “Chances are, it’s not colic – but that doesn’t mean it’s not terrifying!

  1. I use these bottles for my son. Got it at the Baby Expo last year. Really works. He has never had any issues. My daughter was on Dr Brown’s many years ago. These Difrax bottles are way easier to clean than the Dr Brown’s. Took a risk buying bottles I’ve never heard of before but a very happy customer.

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    1. I couldn’t agree more Mariska. The Dr Brown’s bottles are tricky to clean whereas the Difrax bottles are so easy – I find them easier to clean than normal bottles actually. So glad we took a chance on them too!

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